Balochistan- ‘the land of the Baloch’, which had been forcefully acceded to Pakistan has been in a state of constant turmoil since its forced union with the nation and since then has been incessantly demanding for freedom from the Pakistani oppression and a state of its own.

The natural resources rich province despite its fertile and productive land has remained the most backward region in Pakistan as the government has not only made these resources unavailable to the populace but also insures by various slick means that they remain out of reach of the locals thereby suppressing them and their development in hopes for them to give up their fight for freedom. A province which otherwise could have flourished on several levels has still not lost hope and is regardless fighting against the Pakistani government.

Recently the on-going Baloch movement has been strikingly joined by women, youth and the children of Balochistan, reflecting their dedication, intensity and resentment of the county towards the unfair and remorseless atrocities inflicted by the authority of Pakistani government on the populace of Balochistan.

The apparent root cause of the problem being Islamabad’s sly policy of divide and rule. The government instead of taking an all in approach to solve the problems in Balochistan, have continued with its reiterating attempts of exploiting the tribal enmities within the Baloch making it all the way more complex instead of solving the blazing issue.

This crooked policy has been encouraged since 1948 and seems to have made its way into the present, where the government has been pitting Mir Ali Bugti, a grandson of Nawab Bugti against his cousin Brahamdagh Bugti, son of Akbar Bugti. These base gimmicks of the authority have continued with their releasing cryptic reports on Baloch nationalists backing off of the military operations and adopting a softer approach in collaboration with the government, creating a further rift.

These base gimmicks of the authority have continued with their releasing cryptic reports on Baloch nationalists backing off of the military operations and adopting a softer approach in collaboration with the government, creating a further rift. But all this is rather suspicious with the growing Chinese interference in Gwadar port matter which has garnered quite an influence on the Pakistani government. In the wake of the China-Pakistan deal, both the parties stand in for a major benefit which could be hindered with the ongoing Baloch nationalist movement. The real agenda kept at a hands distance is instead coloured with the pretence of benefits and upliftment for the province. To this the pivotal question that arises is, when all the previous upliftment programmes introduced by Pakistan have failed to do any good how different is it going to be this time? Or is it just a facade created by both the parties to reap benefits at the cost of the Baloch people. With China benefitting to get hold of Gwadar, which has the potential to develop into a full-fledged regional hub and a trans-shipment port, is smartly creating its pipelines into the province remaining in the background creating an illusion of Pakistani hold in the matters. What the authority has again and again failed to realise here is the fact that all the manoeuvring might back-fire and result in a much more staunch rebellion from the nationalists resulting in their loss of a highly beneficial province much like Bangladesh.